Get to know a Goddess: Part 1

A Note from Amanda

Hello my Loves! I know – where the heck have I been? WELL – long story short, my life has been crazy. Last month I took in my nephew, and it’s been crazy keeping up with work, my son, and rearranging my home and routine to accomodate my nephew. I’ve loved having him here, but it has meant putting things on hold- like my poor blog. But, thanks to my mom who randomly found a big box of witchy books, I found a book that inspired me to write a little series for you guys. This time of year is crazy for everyone, and it’s important to keep in touch with your spirituality – especially when things are going well. It takes a few moments a day to stop and think about the Divine. Yesterday I was having a really rough day, so I put my notebooks away, closed my computer, and cleaned and smudged my home. As soon as the exhaust fans sucked out the erratic, emotional energy, I felt at peace. I felt connected to my Matron goddess, the Morrigan. But there are so many goddesses, and I know, as much as Morrigan loves her Ravens, she is fair and she has directed my attention to a number of other goddesses. In the box of books was 365 Goddess by Patricia Telesco. It features a new goddess everyday. So I thought hey-I should share this with my readers! So I’ve done a little research for each of the goddesses I plan to feature in this series, and have designed a 10 part series all about goddesses, and the goodness they can bring into your life. Enjoy my loves!

November 14th: Pukkeenegak

Pukkeenegak is an Inuit goddess who presides over the household and all community affairs. She’s a mother figure, and watches over children, ensuring they have enough food and clothing. She is depicted with a tattooed face, wearing boots and a pretty dress that is ‘befitting the patroness of seamstresses’.

Themes:

  • Kinship
  • Community
  • Thankfulness
  • Charity
  • Kindness

Symbols:

  • Tattoos

Celebrating Pukkeenegak

Today is the Asking Festival in Alaska. Children and adolescents go door to door gathering foods for a huge community feast. After the meal, people petition one another for gifts, “exchanging the entire community’s goods in the spirit of thanksgiving.”. (Telesco, 1998) To honor Pukeenegak, organze a potluck dinner, leaving a place dedicated just for her.

As she is the Patroness of Seamstresses, wear special clothing to reflect the goddesses’ gift with needle and thread. Or, in light of community, organize a clothing or a coat drive. Each one of the recipients of the donated goods will also receive a blessing from Pukkeenegak.

Tense situations seem to always tag along with holidays and season changes, so it’s bound to slither into your home. If it has, you can call the goddess to your home by drawing an emblem of peace over your heart chakra or the back of your hand. Use a non-toxic marker or body paint, of course. Let it wear off naturally, by which time the soothing magic of Pukkeenegak will have permeated your home.

Symbols of Peace

Telesco, P. 1998. 365 Goddess: A Daily Guide to the Magic and Inspiration of the Goddess. New York, NY: HarperCollins

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